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Screen Shot 2017-07-30 at 18.46.12.pngFerrari dominated the Hungarian Grand Prix, despite the best efforts of Lewis Hamilton to take the fight to Sebastian Vettel. The German struggled throughout the race with a steering problem but Kimi Raikkonen duly sat behind him, carefully not doing anything to threaten the situation. This will have done the Finn no harm at all with his 2018 ambitions to stay at Maranello. Kimi played the roll of tail-gunner for Vettel all afternoon, while Valtteri Bottas allowed Lewis Hamilton to pass him to see if Lewis could mount a challenge. He pushed hard but there was no way, and so on the last lap Lewis handed third place back to Valtteri. Max Verstappen was right behind them at the finish despite having got himself into trouble early in the race for bumping Daniel Ricciardo off the track. It was a good day for McLaren, which scored points with both cars, which lifts the Woking team off the bottom in the Constructors’ World Championship, pushing Sauber to the back. Also scoring well were the two Force India duo with Sergio Perez bundling his way ahead of Esteban Ocon on the first lap (the two did make contact…) They finished eighth and ninth, behind Carlos Sainz in his Toro Rosso. It was a bad day for Williams, for Renault and for Haas. Williams was without Felipe Massa, who went home before the race, feeling unwell and the team drafted in Paul di Resta, who had been planning to commentate for Sky, standing in for Martin Brundle…

– We analyse at the controversial halo rules

– We examine the future of Formula 1

– We detail who is testing this week in Budapest

– We look at single seater racing in Australia

– We chart the rise of social media in the sport

– We look back at Nigel Mansell’s victory in the Hungarian Grand Prix of 1989

– JS mulls over pizza dinners, Cinderallas and baked beans

– DT is depressed about the way the world is going

– The Hack writes of the halo, the Honda Jazz and

– Plus we have the fabulous photography of the Nygaard Clan

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